Comparison

The Best 50mm You Can Buy: Canon RF 50mm f1 2L vs Sigma Art 50mm f1 4 vs EF 50mm f1 2L

The 50mm focal length is one of the more popular focal lengths on the market. Almost every photographer has or currently owns a 50mm prime lens. There’s just something about that focal length and the wide aperture that appeals to most of us. Even Henri Cartier-Bresson shot with a good 50mm and coincidentally it too was an f/1.2 lens.

 

In my latest video I compare three 50mm lenses. The first of the three is one of my favourites, the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art. This is a fantastic option due to it’s relatively affordable price point and fantastic optical performance. Even now it remains a brilliant option and I highly recommend it. The second is the EF 50mm f/1.2L. I really enjoyed shooting with this lens because even with that super wide aperture it’s a relatively tiny light weight lens. Personally, I really value light lenses with a small form factors. Then there is the new RF mount 50mm f/1.2L lens for Canon’s new mirrorless system. This lens is simply brilliant and quite possibly the best 50mm lens ever made. Yes it is expensive but it’s also an incredible performer.

Check out the full video and find out why I think this new RF lens is the best 50mm you can buy.

Fujifilm X-T3 vs X-T2 Which Camera Should You Buy

Fujifilm is one of my favourite camera companies for a number of reasons. They continually develop new and interesting products and the Fuji X-T2 was noted as being one of the best APS-C cameras when it first came out. More recently, Fuji released their update, the Fuji X-T3 which now begs the question, is it a worthy upgrade?

 

In our latest video we compare the X-T2 to the X-T3 and aim to answer this question. Looking at just the spec sheets, one can assume that the X-T3 is simply a minor update. Sure the new camera does boast much better video features like 4k 60p which is incredibly useful. Other then that, it’s difficult to tell what the major improvements are. In the video above we put both cameras through a number of tests to see how good the X-T3 is compared to the older and still a fan favourite the X-T2. Personally I think that just based on the video features alone it may be worth spending that little extra to get the upgrade. Of course, your mileage may vary and if you’re just interested in the photography features then the new camera may not be as appealing as the cheaper older model.

Check out the full video to see how they both compare to one another and let me know what you think.

Sony In-Body Stabilization vs Canon Lens Image Stabilization Which Is Best: IBIS vs IS

If you’ve ever used any camera that has in-body image stabilisation (IBIS) like the Sony a7R III you’ll know just how useful i can be. It allows you extra flexibility in low light situations to shoot with slower shutter speeds and prevents motion blur. Unfortunately, if you’re a Canon shooter, there are currently no cameras that offer this feature.

 

In several interviews, Canon has confirmed their reasons for not implementing IBIS in any of their cameras so far. They discuss how lens image stabilisation (IS) is a much more effective manner and IBIS simply cannot compete how good lens IS if. This is a pretty strong claim and I wanted to test how true it is. For that reason in the video linked above, I compare Sony’s IBIS vs Canon’s IS to see which one is, in fact, the better performer. The lenses I use for this comparison include the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro, the EF 24mm f/2.8 IS and one of the latest lenses from Canon the 85mm f/1.4L IS. For Sony I chose the a7R III, the FE 28mm f/2.0 and the Zeiss Batis 85mm f/1.8.

Overall I have to say I am impressed with how both systems perform however the flexibility of Sony’s IBIS does offer some additional benefits. Check out the full video to see which system of stabilisation is the best.

How To Get Medium Format Colours With Full Frame: Canon 5DSR vs Phase One IQ3 Trichromatic

How To Get Medium Format Colours With Full Frame: Canon 5DSR vs Phase One IQ3 Trichromatic

In this video, I show how you can produce incredible colours with your full-frame camera. Using the Canon 5DSR and a Colour Checker Passport I demonstrate how you can achieve colours that are either very close or potentially even better than medium format cameras. 

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100mp Phase One vs Canon 5DSR and A7RII: Architectural photography

What is the absolute best camera you can buy for Architectural photography? Many professional photographers would immediately say "medium format technical camera". For the longest time, I believed this to be true and assumed that for the absolute best image quality for the kind of work I do I would eventually need to upgrade to a medium format system. I believed this until I actually tried the system and made some objective comparisons.

In the video linked below, I demonstrate how medium format and Rodenstock lenses actually perform against full frame cameras and dispel some widely known "truths".  
 

Link to images  

Fstoppers tutorial

Canon 5DSR vs 5D Mark IV, which should you buy?

When it comes to buying new cameras, it can sometimes be quite difficult deciding which is best. This seems to be especially true when it comes to deciding between the Mark IV and 5DSR. A number of people have been asking me which of these two would be best to buy and in this review, I aim to answer that question. 

I will quickly mention, before starting this review I thought that this was a tough question, however, as I did more and more comparisons, the decision became much clearer and easier. Also, I was a little conscious about the length of the original video so I have split some of the comparisons into a second unlisted video, available for you to view below. 

To begin with, we started in the studio taking a few images of Amina who is a fantastic model. Considering my lack of experience working with models I decided it would be best to have my friend Imran take over for this section. His experience working in studios and with models meant that he could deliver the results and also express his thoughts. Ultimately he wasn't too bothered about the extra features of the Mark IV and opted to side with the 5DSR. The detail and clarity were what really blew him away. Things to consider are the fact that when shooting with the 5DSR, any issues in your technique will be amplified and the results can be vastly different. The 5DSR is a very unforgiving camera whereas the Mark IV can be far more flexible and forgiving to your techniques.

Dynamic range can be quite an important feature for allot of people and this is where the 5D Mark IV really excels. For any single image taken from each of these cameras the Mark IV images are far more flexible and clean. The amount you can recover safely really make a difference to your workflow, you may not need to take that extra shot you do with the 5DSR increasing time spent and storage costs. Having said that, adding some noise reduction to the 5DSR can really shrink the gap. Also if time and storage costs are not a factor for you then using several layers to create the final image will really increase the difference in image quality. Both have their respective advantages in this area and it depends on your individual requirements. 

Long exposures have similar results in that the 5DSR is much noisier when compared to the 5D Mark IV across the frame. This is going to a much bigger factor to consider if you're shooting at slightly higher ISO, as the amount of noise may start to make the images unusable for many. Noise reduction will still clean up the 5DSR images quite a bit making them very comparable and potentially even more detailed. 

The main areas where the 5DSR can perform really well are colours, sharpness and detail. In controlled environments where you shoot at the lowest ISO, you can achieve some of the absolute best image quality. The colours tend to be more vibrant and accurate based on my testing and the detail is significantly more.

Final Thoughts

Personally, I much prefer the 5DSR, the incredible image quality and detail are very appealing to me. Most of my professional shoots are done using manual lenses, therefore I tend to take my time for each image ensuring I'm getting the best results. I enjoy shooting with more layers and bringing out the extra detail in post, that to me is part of the fun and not at all a chore. 

Before doing this comparison I didn't enjoy using the Mark IV very much at all because to me, it represents a little bit of a middle finger from Canon. Having said that, after doing all of these tests and comparing it to the 5DSR, I now firmly believe that it is one of the best cameras you can buy. For most people, the Mark IV is a much better option, the 5DSR is far too niche of a camera for the majority. Yes, the 5DSR does have better image quality, however, image quality is not really that important when comparing cameras at this level. For that extra detail and resolution, you will be sacrificing far too many useful features to make it worth while. On top of that, the Mark IV will dramatically improve your workflow when compared to the 5DSR. The cleaner and more flexible images straight out of the camera from the Mark IV mean that for most uses it is far more effective.  

I'm still quite disappointed in Canon for releasing a camera with such unnecessary and obvious limits. Even with that, however, I strongly recommend the 5D Mark IV above the 5DSR.  

Please check out my video above and if you're interested in seeing some of the other tests I did please check out the second video below.